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10 Questions with the Jungle Disk CEO

By Paola Cobos
Aug 8, 2018

I‘ve recently had the opportunity to interview the CEO of Jungle Disk, Bret Piatt, and ask him valuable questions regarding the start of the company and the San Antonio community that surrounds it. Prior to the Q&A, I had spoken to Bret a few times and was always surprised by his entrepreneurial spirit that led him to the creation of what is now Jungle Disk. Since I want to be an entrepreneur myself, I took advantage of this opportunity to ask him more in-depth questions, which can be hard to ask in day-to-day conversation.

Through these 10 questions, I was able to grasp several concepts that come into play when creating your own business from scratch. Granted, Jungle Disk was already a company when Bret Piatt and CFO, Huw Edwards, acquired it from Rackspace, but it took a lot of effort to reinvigorate the company — from rebranding to improving the website in order to create the current Jungle Disk that you see online today. Bigger details, such as choosing San Antonio as the home for the company, required a lot of vision from both Bret and Huw, who saw the potential in what is now a fast-growing technology hub. As Bret explained in his interview, they have seen the investment already paying off in the last few years as there are more IT career opportunities and technology development happening in Texas and specifically San Antonio. He hopes San Antonio could be the next Silicon Valley for cybersecurity.

Bret also gave great advice regarding what young people, such as me, entering the industry should keep up with to stay ahead of the game in such a competitive market. We also talked about the top cybersecurity tip that most people ignore, which is to be careful to which Wi-Fi network you connect to. By granting this permission, you could be exposing yourself to great danger. This is a thought that doesn’t come up when you’re in Starbucks and need to use the free Wi-Fi — you never think of what you are giving up in exchange of this connectivity. As my dad always says, “Nothing is given for free in life, there is always something you give in exchange.” When I was little, I always thought he referred to dangers such as accepting candy from strangers in the street, but now I can see how it’s true in other ways. We should always be aware of possible threats to our security. This is especially true in a world where our passwords, credit card information, identity and other personal data can be easily found if we are hacked.